Due to the time involved and the transient nature of products we are not creating in development pages for them.

However, the expansions that we currently have under development for distribution Steam Marketplace are regularly featured in the blog as key points are reached.

For more information about the current state of development of individual packs please take a look at our Trello Board.

This expansion tells a part of the story of the more than 24,000 21T hoppers built by British Railways to several different diagrams over the 10 years from 1949. These wagons were a continuation of a former LNER design, with some of the earliest examples featuring the long brake lever and single-sided brakes of late LNER examples and also riveted bodywork. The various diagrams featured 2 styles of side ribs, but all had 5 ribs per side. By 1952, examples of Diagram 1/146 started to appear with welded bodies, the shorter BR style brake lever and Morton brakegear, with a single brake shoe to each wheel. This could be considered to be the standard design, with nearly 17,000 constructed.

This expansion tells a part of the story of the more than 24,000 21T hoppers built by British Railways to several different diagrams over the 10 years from 1949. These wagons were a continuation of a former LNER design, with some of the earliest examples featuring the long brake lever and single-sided brakes of late LNER examples and also riveted bodywork. The various diagrams featured 2 styles of side ribs, but all had 5 ribs per side. By 1952, examples of Diagram 1/146 started to appear with welded bodies, the shorter BR style brake lever and Morton brakegear, with a single brake shoe to each wheel. This could be considered to be the standard design, with nearly 17,000 constructed.

This expansion tells a part of the story of the more than 24,000 21T hoppers built by British Railways to several different diagrams over the 10 years from 1949. These wagons were a continuation of a former LNER design, with some of the earliest examples featuring the long brake lever and single-sided brakes of late LNER examples and also riveted bodywork.

The various diagrams featured 2 styles of side ribs, but all had 5 ribs per side.

British Railways decided that changes in the steel industry would require the use of more bogie vehicles, and as a consequence built a number of different designs. The wagons, fitted with bolsters to support the load, were mainly grouped according to length (and hence the nominal capacity).

The largest were classed as Bogie Bolster D, being 52ft in length with a load capacity of 42 tons.

Throughout the 1980s the major drive from British Rail and the Government was for customers to invest in their own equipment and facilities. Scrap traffic was no exception and some very successful private owner wagon types were produced.

However, with the withdrawal of vacuum braked trains and hence the 16T mineral wagons that had been used there was a need for air braked wagons to carry scrap metal from scrap yards to processing plants. A quick and easy solution was the conversion of redundant HEA coal hoppers.

One of the features of railway operation until the mid-1990s was the requirement for trains carrying ‘Dangerous Goods’ to be formed with barrier wagons to help protect the crew in the event of a collision by increasing distance from the cargo (for safety reasons or at least due to Union pressure) and providing a ‘crumple zone’ in the event of low to medium speed rear end collision. In the case of the relatively short nuclear flask trains the additional vehicles provided extra brake force allowing the train to avoid having to run at restricted speed.

As domestic and industrial coal traffic dwindled during the 1980s increasing numbers of relatively new HEA coal hoppers were to be found sitting in marshalling yards without any traffic to carry.

Some 44 wagons were converted during 1995 by fitting a retractable flexible cover operated by a windlass at solebar level. The conversion of the hoppers was an attempt by the shadow privatisation company Loadhaul to make use of the valuable wagons that were sitting idle and to attract new bulk freight traffic that required protection from the elements to the railways.

As domestic and industrial coal traffic dwindled during the 1980s increasing numbers of relatively new HEA coal hoppers were to be found sitting in marshalling yards without any traffic to carry.

Some 44 wagons were converted by Loadhaul during 1995 by fitting a retractable flexible cover operated by a windlass at solebar level. Following privatisation the hoppers became the responsibility of English, Welsh and Scottish Railway who repainted a number of them in their own livery albeit in a couple of different variations.

The covered goods van has been a feature of railway goods services for well over a century and has naturally developed over that time.

At nationalisation British Railways inherited a large fleet of short wheelbase vans capable of carrying about 12 Tons. British Railways continued this tradition and built considerable numbers of short wheelbase vans while gradually incorporating new ideas and features. In the 1960s British Rail began to develop higher capacity, long wheelbase, air braked vans as they developed their Air Braked Network, a process which saw a number of different designs produced.

The railways have always been good at making use of things they have lying around to create something new and useful and when the need arose for new engineering various spare air braked wagons made suitable donors.

Converted during the early 1990's the Sea Urchins were designed as a replacement for older vacuum braked and unfitted engineers wagons used for carrying ballast or spoil with reinforcing ribs to help them withstand the battering given to them by mechanical excavators when loading or unloading.

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